What’s Running In December

Socks4Life.com

Socks4Life.com

Why, Hello December! The month of sugar and spice and everything nice – we’re hoping anyway and praying as far as running is concerned. I figure we’re in good stead this being the month we celebrate Jesus’ birth and all, plus the weather has been pretty decent so far. Hope is alive and the runner in me celebrates this with a happy run and a slight adjustment to end of year goals.

Truly, I’m not making this up on the fly nor do I believe I’m alone in my mid-goal pivot. I have always believed that it is the person who is able to grasp opportunities as they are presented that is more often than not successful in his/her endeavors. Of course it’s always a bit risky to veer off a predetermined path but you’ll never discover your strengths or true potential if you never challenge yourself to discover the badass within. And the truth is, we all have that person in us. It may take different things to incite us to action, but that’s only because we’re all uniquely different and does not speak to any timidity or lack of initiative in us. I firmly believe that runners are by far an enterprising lot. Consider the  tenacity it takes to train for a race and the sometimes brutal conditions we must endure only to fall short on race day. Our response, usually, is to right away sign up for the next race with as little fanfare as possible – tenacity is only outdone by the determination to minimize the achievement. So I’m in awesome company I know.

To this end, I had no problem on deciding  to push up my decision to qualify for the TCS NYC Marathon 2017 this month. With not a lot of options left in terms of races to choose from, limited time left to qualify and with the weather at its uncertain best, it will take a lot of faith and some crazy running to pull this off. I think I’m up for the challenge though. Since I’ve opted to go the half-marathon entry route, it’s crunch time with training and racing happening all in the next couple weeks.

The rest of the month will find me keeping my Wednesday group runs, doing speed work twice a week in Central Park, weather permitting, and getting a long run in on the weekend. I usually add some cross-training somewhere in there to mix things up a bit. So far, so good; while I’m optimistic we’ll close off the year in good spirits, so much depends on the weather. Hopefully, my optimism is contagious and that will only bring good running.🙏

🍂Tis’ the Season to be Thankful🍁🍂🍁

thanksgiving

“I note the obvious differences
between each sort and type,
but we are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.
We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.  .  .”  ~Maya Angelou

The truth is I’ve had a pretty amazing year and have so many reasons to be thankful. I think of thanksgiving as a time to count our blessings, for though they are many, sometimes we can get mired down in the nitty-gritty stuff that insidiously plants itself in our psyche, and causes us to forget the tremendous miracle that is life. For this reason this day is important; a day for us to consciously remember and actively express our gratitude to a God who is unmatched in His favor toward us.

My gratitude extends beyond being thankful for the amazing runs this year. Though I am indeed thankful for those, I am even more enamored with my journey via running: my travels, the people I’ve met, new friends I made, the development of my body – strength and endurance, how I was able to redefine my boundaries and limits, the ability to use running as a platform to impact lives and channel growth, change and inspiration and learning to see God everywhere. These are by far the more valuable things I am exceedingly grateful for this Thanksgiving and beyond.

I’d like to think that many of us who share a passion for the same sport have some of these things in common as well. And so, as we sit before our table today surrounded by loved ones, I pray that our hearts are as bountiful and overflowing as the spread before us and that we give thought and prayers to those who may not have the same opportunity to give thanks. We are blessed always to be a blessing my friends.

Happy Thanksgiving Day!

Fall Running and End of Year Goals Check

Courtesy shutterstock.com

Courtesy shutterstock.com

Mirror, mirror on the wall, I’ll always get up after I fall. And whether I run , walk or have to crawl, I’ll set my goals and achieve them all.

Who would have “thunk” it? I mean, Thanksgiving is less than a week away, we have about a month left of Fall and the year’s end is less than a month and a half away at this point. If your life is anything like mine, or even if you’re the average Jane just taken up with getting life done daily, I’ll wager that you’re one of those that’s watching the fast-approaching New Year with some trepidation and the sound of the words “Wait, I’m not done yet!” are not just mine I hear echoing.

Most of us make a big deal about setting goals at the beginning of the year with every intention of seeing our very noble ambitions come to fruition by the year’s end. But unless you’re a human machine, by which I mean you’re perfect, then it’s probably not turning out quite the way you planned it. Welcome to life. The good news is that you’re not alone. On the other hand, there’s not a lot of time left if you’re wanting to separate yourself from the pack.

We, who are focused and goal-oriented, understand that fulfilling all our goals in a given year has a 55% or greater chance of not happening; yet we make them anyway because we’d rather have a success rate of 75% than nothing to show after 365/6 days. And so that’s where I’m going to assume you’re at – more than half way there. We can recommit to making the most of this last month of fall days, as for sure colder weather is on its way and then we’ll have to reconfigure what that means for running. Right now, the parks are lovely, the sun is still warm and daytime running is happening.

For those of us still goal focused then this is the time to make it happen. Let these last weeks count and stay the course. Granted, there’s only so much you can do and that’s fine. Each day is a day to push forward just a little and bit by bit we will get there. So drum up those miles, get some training in if there’s a race coming up, run some new routes (for the adventurous) or just basically enjoy running for the next few weeks and stay fit (even with and after all the turkey and holiday treats). While we rarely get do-overs in life, each day presents an opportunity to either start something new or add to what we’ve already done. My promise is, come December 31, when you’ve given it your all, you’ll be glad you did.

How Exercise and Running can help with the stresses of life

Source: WebMD.com

Source: WebMD.com

This past week a monumental shift occurred in American politics, the people elected a new president in the person of Donald J. Trump. Now this in and of itself while big news is no cause for concern as elections are held every four years. But, unless you’ve been under a rock somewhere, you know what has transpired in the last sixteen months of American politics. Thus, the results of the election has underlined a deep divide in the electorate and catapulted a seemingly generally unpopular and controversial person into the role of president elect. Many are calling for boycotts, protests, cessation and are even threatening to leave the country and this is only locally. Internationally, the backlash has many governments and people weighing in with many expressing negative emotions, chief among them uncertainty as it pertains to US policy and relations with international counterparts. Amidst all of this life continues for the average man or woman. He or she must continue to rise with the sun and cope with life as it unfolds.

Whatever side you end up on, there’s no denying that life is enormously stressful for some people right now and extends a ways into the foreseeable future. With Thanksgiving and Christmas just around the corner, and Winter looming, there’s enough going on to keep you in stress mode for some time. The runner and opportunist in me sees all that’s happening and is determined to use it as a platform to make necessary and positive improvements to myself, and to encourage the same of others. If you’ve never given thought to pursuing a health strategy before then there has never been a better time. A good exercise plan is a great idea to begin the holiday season and an excellent way to channel all negative emotions and energy in a positive way.

Exercise has been shown in countless studies to effectively treat stress, depression, anxiety and even the common cold (active.com). It is a universal remedy that is natural, relatively low-cost and pretty accommodating. Here’s how:

(1) It has been known to increase endorphins which lift your spirits and promote your feel good receptors. It’s why you often hear people talk about how great they feel post a run or an exercise session even if they had reservations about doing it in the first place.

(2) A good workout can cause you to sleep better. It reduces your chances of tossing and turning and affords you a more restful sleep which translates into less irritability and moodiness and promotes a more alert, driven and positive attitude.

(3) Running can provide an avenue to let go, block out and/or clear one’s head. Lacing up a pair of sneakers and going for a run engages your entire body system (muscular, cardio & respiratory) in getting on board in a cohesive response to stress which develops this ability for future responses.

(4) A group run or exercise class can promote healthy relationships and friendships that can provide encouragement, validation, accountability and forge solidarity while providing a host of avenues to engage in stress-relieving behaviors.

(5) A good exercise plan that promotes excellent health can give you focus and purpose and engages your time wisely thus providing less time to worry and dwell on things that are stress-inducing.

(6) Having a schedule or routine is a marvelous way to organize and take back control of your life especially during uncertain times or in times of political upheaval such as this. It gives one comfort to know that he or she is taking positive steps to get desired results.

(7) Running with new people, exploring a new route or trail, or taking on a new race distance or cross-training activity can provide stimulation as the element of risk or trying something new produces excitement and challenge; this channels our flight or fight responses into engaging in new methods to preserve self and sanity.

(8) Choose an exercise you love and you’ll get the best results. Life is challenging enough as it is without trying to take on something that will just add more stress. There are a variety of exercises to choose from. There is no rule that says you have to choose this or that. Find what works for you; whether it’s running, walking, cycling, yoga, kickboxing, swimming or any or all of these or one on the endless list of exercises out there. There is an exercise for you that will leave you happy and satisfied. Discover your niche, run with it and leave stress behind.

Getting into the zone where you appreciate that exercise or any of these activities provide a challenge yes, but is offset by your ability, focus and energy can be pretty liberating and empowering. No case has ever been made where stress allowed to thrived have produced anything but more stress, a decline in health and chronically negative attitudes and behaviors. The onus is on you, the individual, runner or not, to seize the opportunity before you and rise above current circumstances – just as the american patriot chooses to rise above partisan politics, for the greater good – in this case, for your greater good.

Sources: themayoclinic.com, active.com, runnersworld.com

Marathon Weekend: A Celebration of Running

Runners cross the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge at the start of the New York City Marathon, Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Runners cross the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge at the start of the New York City Marathon, Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

You know you’re a goner/runner when there’s a super-huge racing event coming up and though you had made the decision the year earlier not to run, you’re here mad wishing that you could be running – my current predicament as it relates to the TCS New York City (NYC) Marathon this Sunday. Of course it doesn’t help that the city is abuzz with Marathon fever and I’m smack in the center of it. I’m running past the finish line and on part of the course during my weekly runs for crying out loud. Is it any wonder then? Add to that the number of runners who are so happy to share their epic moment and I’m just about ready to forget all about the challenges and pain of last year and take up anyone’s offer to run in their place – just to be a part of the drama. Then I’m reminded that I do have a part to play, albeit a less challenging one, but surely no less important. I’m happily volunteering at the start!

Post my first time running NYC Marathon, I decided there and then, that I would endeavor to run every other year, partly due to its challenging course and in large part because of the entry criteria. I felt this would leave me with more opportunity to travel and explore other courses. And it has to a large extent so I’m happy with my decision. Around this time though, it’s easy to get caught up in the madness of it all and if you’re me..well, there’s that competitive thing happening..it can’t be helped. As it is, thankfully I know my place and it’ll be out there on the course cheering on those running folks, pouring all the enthusiasm and encouragement that have inspired my running so many times back into hearts and minds of my fellow soul runners. It’s exciting, it’s different, it’s all about running and in it I’ve found my happy place so it’s all good really.

As a brief aside, we’ve stolen into November without much fanfare and with some pretty cool temps. My inner summer is jumping up and down with glee and I’m busy running making the most of the miracle of a Fall that is a bundle of gorgeousness, from the cool weather to the mirage of colors as far as the eye can see. I love it here. It’s the perfect weather for running why wouldn’t I? The predicted weather for Sunday seems pretty cool – high 40s with a bit of a headwind at the start and heading into Brooklyn, then warming up to a high of 58 with partly sunny skies. A marathoner can do wonders with this I think. These conditions are much preferred over last year, which was much warmer; for that we are thankful.

Meanwhile, we begin Marathon weekend with lots of running-related events: Ascis Extra Mile Challenge, the Marathon Opening Ceremony, The Marathon Expo, The Night of Champions dinner tonight, then the Abbott Dash to the Finish race tomorrow leading up to the Marathon on Sunday, which will kick off with the NYRR (New York Road Runners) Youth Invitational and the kids leading the way of the few final miles of the race. All in all, it’ll be a good weekend for running. Of course I’m getting my runs in amidst all of this. Juggling it all is half the fun.

centralpark.com

centralpark.com

 

 

 

Tips to a PR in the TCS New York City Marathon

Chief Petty Officer Noah Bray from Coast Guard Sector New York crosses the finish line at the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon, Nov. 2, 2014. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons.)

Chief Petty Officer Noah Bray from Coast Guard Sector New York crosses the finish line at the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon, Nov. 2, 2014. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons.)

It’s nine days to Marathon Sunday here in New York City. For a lot of runners that means nine days of excitement, anticipation and tapering. For many others it may mean nine days of trepidation, anxiety and stress. It doesn’t matter where you fall on the emotional spectrum, your feelings couldn’t be more valid as it relates to this marathon. Trumped as perhaps the best and one of the more challenging marathons out there, the hype is real and you will need all of your wits and will to master this course and wring a PR out of it.

The competitive runner understands that each race is different and that despite a well-executed training plan one has to be ready and willing to look at all avenues and consider all possibilities if the aim is finishing within a goal time.  As it is, the TCS New York City Marathon boasts a field size of 50,000 runners, the largest in the world, who are geared up to run the race of a lifetime hoping for the experience of a lifetime. It will be their special time on the running world stage where everyone gets a moment to shine – a shot at glory – if you will.

As a two-time New York City (NYC) and all-round ten-time marathoner I have found this to be a tough and challenging course if you’re running for a goal time. If you’re simply wanting to finish, then you can easily do that, the crowds will get you there. However, if you’re looking for a personal best, a PR or sub 3:30, whether you’re a newbie or a repeat marathoner, you may want to bear these pointers in mind:

  • November’s weather can be very unpredictable. In the days leading up to the race pay careful attention to weather advisories and prepare your body by eating well – carbing up, hydrating well and resting well. This is standard pre-race procedure and will serve you well on race day in being alert, focused and feeling energised.
  • Use a foam roller or the stick the night before race day to get out any kinks or muscle tightness. Roll out leg and thigh muscles especially, it leaves you limber and loose and ready to run.
  • Dress appropriately. Use layers that can be efficiently discarded on course since it’s very likely that the start will be cold. I like to run at least the first three miles with a heated sheet so my body temperature slowly builds to comfortable race temps, then I discard it.
  • First time marathoners or first time NYC marathoners should be wary of the start. If you’re in the early corrals, the start can be really packed and chances are you’ll be running toe-to-toe with other runners for a few miles, be prepared to adjust or slow your pace to accommodate this.
  • Engaging in dodging and weaving in the early segments of the race utilizes a lot of energy and can cost you later on. It is better to follow the crowd while awaiting the opportunity to increase your pace.
  • It is also very easy to get caught up in the crowds and excitement in the beginning, be wary of going out too fast too soon; pace yourself and stick to it until you’re at least half-way there.
  • Ideally, you want to go for a negative split and up the ante at the halfway point, just be careful to increase gradually.
  • To stay properly hydrated and energized, I would suggest a grab and go strategy at each fuel station indulging in a brief sip before discarding.
  • Alternate between water and Gatorade if available.
  • Add energy gels every four miles after mile 8 (miles 12, 16, 20, 24).
  • Try not to stop at the fuel stations and stick to the outside of the pack in order to get to the middle or end of the tables to grab your fuel so you don’t get caught up in the rush at the onset of the stations.
  • Drink just enough fuel. This a good strategy that will save you time, energy and discomfort as you want to minimize or eliminate any bathroom breaks or any stop as this will impede your goal time.
  • Appreciate the crowds and volunteers who are there to make your race experience an amazing one. Buy into the cheers and raves and encourage them with a smile, a wave, a clap and/or a thank you; it adds to your momentum especially in the latter part of the race when you’ll be needing all the encouragement you can get.
  • At this point it will be helpful if you have a number, name, country, or cause on display that the crowds can tie you to. They will use it to call you out and cheer you on and you’ll appreciate that.
  • Look out for the Queensborough bridge ( you cross five bridges in the NYC Marathon), it’ll be around mile 16, at this point you’ll be on the threshold of tiredness and pushing real hard. If you can keep the momentum going up this seeming mountain then you’ll be rewarded on the other side with the rising crescendo of voices, all cheering for you. What a thrill! You’re treated to the screams and cheers of what feels and may very well be a million spectators, from all over the world, as you enter 2nd Ave in Manhattan. This is the reason you run, there’s no greater feeling for a runner than right there and then. Remember that and own it.
  • Running down Fifth Ave from the Upper East Side in Manhattan may feel like the toughest part of the race for some, it appears to go on forever ( for about four miles) lean into it, use the energy of the crowds to push you and provide momentum heading into Central Park at 72nd Street.
  • Now is the time for what I call the fishing strategy: keep your eyes on the runner just ahead of you and slowly aim to pass him or her ( as if to reel them in). This will do two things: give you an immediate goal , which feeds your competitive spirit, and take your attention off yourself and whatever discomfort you may be experiencing.
  • Use the downhill in the park, lean into it and glide. On the other hand, power through the inclines feeding off the crowds and knowing that you’re almost there – less than a mile and a half away at this point.

Finally, getting out of the park and onto 59th Street/ Central Park South, it’ll be your quarter mile final stretch before heading into the park once again at Columbus Circle. You’ll hear the roar of the crowds, see the flags lining the roadway to the finish line area as you get into your final turn, the voice of the announcer and spectators will be urging you on; enjoy it, smile for the camera, finish strong. You did it.

Cancer, A Cause to Run for

breastcancermarathon.com

             breastcancermarathon.com

Every month in these United States we advocate, support and highlight a form of cancer and the strides we have made in the fight against it. This dreadful disease can take many forms and insinuates itself into almost every part of the human body; from breast cancer, which we highlight this month, along with liver cancer, to colon cancer and pancreatic cancer among others, we are made aware of the far-reaching effects of cancer as no one remains unaffected by it. For this and other reasons, running is an ideal platform to support the fight against it.

In the month of October most of the western world and organisations like The American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Avon, Memorial Sloan Kettering  and others sponsor, support and/or organize walks and runs that highlight the great work: research, successes and stories of women around the globe living and battling breast cancer everyday. The goal is to bring awareness, increase knowledge and encourage early testing, diagnosis and treatment.

Running is all about utilizing good health to achieve great results. Since we need to be fully functional to do it, it makes sense to use this platform as a means by which cancer research and education can become part of mainstream discussion; particularly breast cancer for us women who are more susceptible to it.

Last weekend, there were walks, around the country and thousands of women came out in support of this worthy cause, raising the bar on the discussion and actively walking out their struggles with breast cancer in the company of family, friends, advocates and supporters. The good news is that many of us were actively involved and got out there as part of the movement. That’s a great start. The weekend before when I ran the Chicago marathon for St Jude in support of the work they do in the field of childhood cancer, I was gratified with all the support and cheers for St Jude. However, I see it in a wider context now, people are deeply affected by cancer and beginning to realize that unless we all unite in the fight against it, chances are very good that one of us may become its next victim.

In this vein, we should strive to become a part of the solution. As runners, what better way to do this than to get our family, friends and supporters behind us to run for a great cause. Cancer is that cause and there are a lot of running opportunities this month and going forward. Most races provide the option to run for or to donate to a favorite charity to run. Just sign up, fundraise or donate, then run – the easiest part. I promise the rewards last beyond the finish line.

pinkribbon

The Chicago Marathon, my running sweet spot

source: bankofamericachicagomarathon.com

@ the start line          bankofamericachicagomarathon.com

Last Sunday 40,400 runners crossed the finish line in Grant Park at The Chicago Marathon. We weaved a determined and exhilarating path through the streets of Chicago, from the downtown area through the suburbs and neighborhoods, out to the medical district and back. Runners came out in their numbers, each wanting their moment of glory, some with personal goals, others as part of a collective effort to raise money for a favorite charity. Whatever the reason, we embraced the warmth, cheers and encouragement of over 1.7 million spectators and thousands of volunteers to cement this, at least in my mind, as the most superbly organized marathon event I have run thus far.

The New York City Marathon runs a close second to Chicago because of its phenomenal crowds and volunteers and because..well, it’s New York. I don’t for one second take for granted how challenging it must be to pull of an event of this magnitude in any city. We, runners, are just super thrilled that organizers of these racing events have the experience and know-how to make it happen and thus afford us these epic moments. Because this was my second time around in Chicago, I was prepared for am amazing race. I had such a good time last year even with a slight injury; this year I had no such encumbrance and felt that as long as I was well rested I would do well. While circumstances did not permit such ideal conditions – I missed my flight on Friday and got in Saturday afternoon, which is an entire blog by itself – for various reasons, many having to do with optimal training (no over-training this time), better rest, hydration and diet in the weeks leading up to race day – all somehow conspired to make sure I ran amazingly well.

bankofamericachicagomarathon.com

bankofamericachicagomarathon.com

Chicago is a beautiful city with a diverse populace and a common passion, or so it seems – a love for running and the marathon. Because I always credit the success of a race in large part to its spectators and volunteers, I truly appreciated the huge turnout on both counts. I maintain there is nothing in the world quite like running down the home stretch of a race to the tune of a roaring crowd urging you on while suddenly hearing your name announced over the loud-speaker as you approach the finish line. That is one of the remarkable moments, and there are others, that we, runners, run for. That and the medal of course.

Like ever race though, this one was different and special. Foremost was my reason for running, I felt so motivated to run for the kids at St Jude’s to the extent that I kept up an average 7:45 min/mile pace for most of the race. My intent was to try for a negative split but I ended up running faster in the first half, then fluctuating a bit, then dropping down to a 8min/mile until mile 24 where I was able to up the anté and run my fastest time through the finish line. I finished at 3:27:11 – my fastest Marathon and a personal best. I was/am thrilled. However, like most type A personalities, I’m quick to see that I could have done better. Because I  was scared of running out of energy, for the first half and a bit beyond, I consciously reigned in my enthusiasm, which was probably wise, as it ensured I finished strong, but it’s also possible I could have put out just a little more, since at the finish I felt reasonably strong.

me @ around mile 15.5 in Chicago's medical district

me @ around mile 15.5 in Chicago’s medical district

Oh well.. hindsight remains what it is while I remain committed to improving that time. My next big race is the Boston Marathon in April while I volunteer at New York City Marathon next month. In the meanwhile before Boston, chances are looking really good for another race.

2016 Bank Of America Chicago Marathon Medal

2016 Bank Of America Chicago Marathon Medal

The Running Life: Finding balance and loving what you do

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Online source unknown

Juggling running, exercise, work, family, volunteer commitments and a social life can be challenging at best. Oftentimes, it can be downright difficult, though there are the few times one is able to soar, until challenge sets in and things progress to the difficult stage; on and on it goes, becoming a cyclical norm that you soon get accustomed to. Difficult much? Yes, Impossible? No. It becomes the goal of the challenged to strike a precarious balance so as to maximize the benefit of all.

Indeed, it doesn’t require any specific skill per se, but ideally a set of character traits and a passion or love for what you do that motivates the heck out of you. The average Joe seeks a purpose in life and has a desire to be happy. Uncovering his purpose and actively working/ walking it out sets him on a path to happiness and success. It is no different for the runner. He or she is able to enjoy the gift of running when other areas of life are in sync. Running may even be seen as the glue that holds it all together – the stress release factor to make sure that everything runs smoothly. However it may be looked upon, it is necessary to apply it in concord with life’s other goals. For example, for those with immediate families running is treated as a family affair. It is encouraged, supported and advocated among family members to ensure that the runner has support to successfully pursue it. As such, it becomes a daily routine of sorts, this ensures it has its place in the runner’s life and maximizes his or her chances of success. Also, it is viewed as much more than a sport, more as a lifestyle with healing and health benefits.

Many successful runners who are not pros pursue running as a passion and tend to build a support network around it. For my part, I find it easier to perform in other areas of my life with running and/or exercise as part of my daily schedule. A typical day either beginning or ending with running will generally flow between family, work and some type of social engagement. Of course I credit the healthy flow among my various roles to running and exercise. I’d be lying if I say I didn’t believe it centers me; but more than that, it gives me an outlet to express so many emotions (negative and positive) as well as provides a basis for my faith and personal growth.

The key on living a successful life, and that may mean different things for different people, remains pretty much constant across the spectrum: find a happy medium. In this your “happy place” you will be able to treat with the challenges of life and be able to channel any resulting negative energy into creating something good. You better believe it, fit and healthy has a lot to do with happy.

10 Popular Fall Races

 

source: bratislava.com

                      source: bratislava.com

Fall, like Spring, to my way of thinking has some of the best running events for the adventurous runner. If you’re anything like me and you’re on the lookout for fun runs with a slight twist of purpose and brimming with pretty, then this is the season for it. From 5ks to marathons, and even ultras, there’s a race for everyone –  from the newbie to the well-seasoned marathoner. Grab a pair of running shoes, pack an overnight bag and be ready to hit the road for some of these races, which are to run for.

  • Oct 8-9: Blue Mountain Beach 1/2 Marathon, 10K//30A, 5k and 10 Mile Weekend; Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
  • 9, 2016: The Bank Of America Chicago Marathon
  • Oct 9, 2016: Portland Marathon; Portland, Ohio
  • Oct 30, 2016: NYCRUNS Haunted Island 10k and 5k; Roosevelt Island, NY
  • Oct 30, 2016: Tussey Mountainback 50 Mile Relay and Ultramarathon; Boalsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Nov 6, 2016: The TCS NYC Marathon
  • Nov 5, 2016: The Presidential 5k and 10k; Washington, DC
  • Nov 12, 2016: Down2Earth 5-10k Cross Country; Dania Beach, Florida
  • Nov 10-13, 2016: Super Heroes Half-Marathon Weekend; Anaheim, California
  • Nov 13, 2016: Mermaid Run, San Francisco (Sirena 10 mile, 10k, 5k)

It’s hard to believe that we’re already knee-deep in the Fall season already. I’m almost afraid to say it but before long we’ll be bidding it adieu and moving on to much tougher weather. That being said, we really just have a couple more months at most or a few weeks at best to take advantage and get out there. Run, volunteer, walk, go on an adventure, discover something; whether it’s a trail, a new course, a PR or even if it’s just a fun run or a new runner friend. The time is now. The season is Fall.

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