Fostering Healthy Habits for Running and Life

The current political and social climate being what it is has led to more and more individuals preoccupied with family life, health, and personal achievement to the point that there seems to be very little room left for much else. Add to that the complexities involved in varying lifestyle choices and these days the average person is just concerned with trying to balance their hectic agenda with minimum intrusions and affect to their standard routine. Many people like the “idea” of fit and healthy and will often do the minimal amount to maintain somewhat of a proper diet and exercise to warrant no ER visits without many realizing that fit and healthy is so much more than food and the odd exercise session. It is a conscious decision to live in harmony with nature while maximizing the gifts (physically, spiritually, and opportunities) we have been blessed with. Things can seem even more exhausting for a runner and fit fanatic like myself, for whom constant diet and exercise is par for the course as healthy living is a prevailing occupation.

The challenge to juggle a regular daily schedule topped off with training, which is often the case for a runner, means that some area of life almost always ends up being neglected. Over the years, I’ve learnt by trial and error that finding the right balance often means the ability to compromise and sacrifice the things we want for what we need. Of course I’m a work-in-progress and learning new things everyday, but in the event you’re open and constantly striving for healthy perfection, as I am, here are a few things I’ve learnt over my running years:

  • Goals are as necessary as breathing. They provide a basis or template to guide your actions and hold you accountable, ensuring that you’re not here, on this earth, just taking up space. List them, update them, revise them and accomplish them.
  • Recognize each day as an opportunity to gain headway in your pursuit of what sets your soul on fire. First things first. Wake up with intent, put your plans before God and allow Him the space during the day to help you carry them out.
  • Determine to love yourself and treat you with the love and care you deserve or no one else will. This means making a studied effort to eat foods that contribute to your physical health and overall well-being. Particularly, snack healthy.
  • Rest well. Getting between 6-8 hours sleep at night allows you to be rested and ready to face the day. A quick power nap during the day, for those who can’t quite make the necessary 6-8 hours, works wonders to help you finish the day strong.
  • Exercise daily. A quick run or slow jog or any other type or combination of exercise (at least 30 minutes) that strays from your routine and increases your heart rate, gets your adrenaline pumping and engages your core muscles encourages good health, engages you productively, helps you sleep better, and leaves you feeling positive and empowered.
  • Don’t be afraid to try new things, which has the power to draw you out of your comfort zone, shake up a boring routine, and cause you to engage and develop new skills and abilities. In fact, challenge yourself ever so often to explore your limits and boundaries in the areas of sport, exercise and adventure. This will add variety and fun to your running and/or journey and keeps life interesting.
  • Contribute to and/ or invest in what you are passionate about. Whatever form it takes, make it meaningful and beneficial to those less fortunate. There are few things more important that letting others know they matter and nothing more rewarding than being a blessing wherever you can.
  • Enjoy running or what you do. While it may be hard and challenging a lot of times, remember nothing worth having ever comes easy. Stay committed by constantly giving yourself pep talks; becoming a member of the community (eg., join a running club or group) who will provide encouragement, support and accountability; educate yourself on the sport; and sign up for some short races and fun runs. It’s like getting indoctrinated into a lifestyle and will change your life.
  • It is often said to surround yourself with yay sayers and it’s true. Giving yourself the best support network there is can help you to realize your true potential. This can take the form of people in your circle, activities, and things; for example, running gear, sneakers and running- related paraphernalia take up a huge junk of my closet space and can be seen throughout my apartment. It speaks for what I’m about and keeps me focused on what matters to me.
  • See failure, and it will come, as an opportunity to try again only with a better idea or a better plan. Don’t allow it to define who you are or what you do. Ask yourself what was the lesson learnt and go out there next time and crush it.
  • Finally, it is often said we are our worst critic; while it is necessary to hold yourself to a high standard, don’t be afraid to recognise and reward yourself when you’ve earned it. Yes there will be, try as you might not to, those berating sessions and self-recriminations but also be the one first one to clap yourself on the back, give yourself a high five, or a hug, and take the credit when it’s due. Reward yourself for your achievements and for a job well done. Be your number one fan (but don’t go crazy). Stay humble and real and above all else, like Shakespeare says, “to thine own self be true.”

In closing, I’d love to tell you that all this is easy and will just get itself done if you say it often enough but the truth, and most of us know this, is that nothing gets done without application, commitment and an overall can do attitude powered by gratitude for who you are, what you have ( ie., your abilities) and the opportunity you have to make a difference in your little corner of the map. An attitude of gratitude will go a long way in cultivating an environment of growth, success and personal excellence.

Motivate, Inspire, Encourage..Run to the Power of Words

Source: shape women's magazine

        Source: shape magazine

It’s not the average person who gets up on a typical day and decides – you know what, this is it..this is my kick-butt, bad- ass day; today I decide to stop with the excuses and show up and do shit ( yep I said it). No, even if you’re a veteran in the game, most days you have to do some heavy self-motivating to get those feet moving out the door. So for the newbie or ambivalent, I imagine it’s much harder. Lucky for you, I’ve been there, I’m still here and likely to be here for sometime into the indefinite future. That way I can always motivate my and your asses to lace up those sneakers and hit it up for some mileage.

Very often I’ve found that if you distance yourself from the naysayers and immerse yourself in an environment that’s supportive of your goals and ideals, you’ve gotten rid of the biggest obstacle to your success. We’ve heard it often enough – words are powerful, they have the power to change the world..to start wars or bring about peace (on a global scale). If this is true, and history tells us it is, then consider if we use, or allow them to be used, to allow positive change in our lives. Of course this is already the case with all the self-help books and other motivational material out there, but what if you and I, we, decide to make it our personal goal to immerse ourselves in those positive, transformational and inspiring words to motivate our next step? What if we make it so it’s the first thing we see and ingest in the morning and the last thing we breathe at night? I think crazy stuff will happen..blow-your-mind stuff.. I mean, we’d be unstoppable, both physically and emotionally; talk about goal achieved!

See, I’ve always believed that our destiny is inherently ours to decide, granted it’s guided and overseen by our Heavenly Father, but ultimately ours, as a by-product of His gifts of unconditional love and freedom of choice to us. We get to take these beautiful, and often self-serving machines, and make it into what we will. And the funny thing is words can help us, be it ours or someone else’s, verbosely, orally or in print. Stick it up, write it down, tattoo it on..however works best to get and keep you moving on the good days and not so good days.

Here are five of my favourite get up and kick ass quotes:

“Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to a stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.” –  ascribed to Leonardo Da Vinci

“Once you make the decision that you will not fail, the heart and body will follow.” – Kara Groucher

“Nothing great in this world was ever accomplished without passion.” – ascribed to George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

“It’s when discomfort strikes they realize, a strong mind is the most powerful weapon.” – Chrissie Wellington

“Our limitations and success will be based, most often, on our own expectations of ourselves. What the mind dwells upon, the body acts upon.” – Dennis Waitley

Of the millions out there, these are my every day mantras. You need to suss yours out and wear it like a talisman, Scouts (runners) honor it will serve you well!

 

 

 

How Exercise and Running can help with the stresses of life

Source: WebMD.com

Source: WebMD.com

This past week a monumental shift occurred in American politics, the people elected a new president in the person of Donald J. Trump. Now this in and of itself while big news is no cause for concern as elections are held every four years. But, unless you’ve been under a rock somewhere, you know what has transpired in the last sixteen months of American politics. Thus, the results of the election has underlined a deep divide in the electorate and catapulted a seemingly generally unpopular and controversial person into the role of president elect. Many are calling for boycotts, protests, cessation and are even threatening to leave the country and this is only locally. Internationally, the backlash has many governments and people weighing in with many expressing negative emotions, chief among them uncertainty as it pertains to US policy and relations with international counterparts. Amidst all of this life continues for the average man or woman. He or she must continue to rise with the sun and cope with life as it unfolds.

Whatever side you end up on, there’s no denying that life is enormously stressful for some people right now and extends a ways into the foreseeable future. With Thanksgiving and Christmas just around the corner, and Winter looming, there’s enough going on to keep you in stress mode for some time. The runner and opportunist in me sees all that’s happening and is determined to use it as a platform to make necessary and positive improvements to myself, and to encourage the same of others. If you’ve never given thought to pursuing a health strategy before then there has never been a better time. A good exercise plan is a great idea to begin the holiday season and an excellent way to channel all negative emotions and energy in a positive way.

Exercise has been shown in countless studies to effectively treat stress, depression, anxiety and even the common cold (active.com). It is a universal remedy that is natural, relatively low-cost and pretty accommodating. Here’s how:

(1) It has been known to increase endorphins which lift your spirits and promote your feel good receptors. It’s why you often hear people talk about how great they feel post a run or an exercise session even if they had reservations about doing it in the first place.

(2) A good workout can cause you to sleep better. It reduces your chances of tossing and turning and affords you a more restful sleep which translates into less irritability and moodiness and promotes a more alert, driven and positive attitude.

(3) Running can provide an avenue to let go, block out and/or clear one’s head. Lacing up a pair of sneakers and going for a run engages your entire body system (muscular, cardio & respiratory) in getting on board in a cohesive response to stress which develops this ability for future responses.

(4) A group run or exercise class can promote healthy relationships and friendships that can provide encouragement, validation, accountability and forge solidarity while providing a host of avenues to engage in stress-relieving behaviors.

(5) A good exercise plan that promotes excellent health can give you focus and purpose and engages your time wisely thus providing less time to worry and dwell on things that are stress-inducing.

(6) Having a schedule or routine is a marvelous way to organize and take back control of your life especially during uncertain times or in times of political upheaval such as this. It gives one comfort to know that he or she is taking positive steps to get desired results.

(7) Running with new people, exploring a new route or trail, or taking on a new race distance or cross-training activity can provide stimulation as the element of risk or trying something new produces excitement and challenge; this channels our flight or fight responses into engaging in new methods to preserve self and sanity.

(8) Choose an exercise you love and you’ll get the best results. Life is challenging enough as it is without trying to take on something that will just add more stress. There are a variety of exercises to choose from. There is no rule that says you have to choose this or that. Find what works for you; whether it’s running, walking, cycling, yoga, kickboxing, swimming or any or all of these or one on the endless list of exercises out there. There is an exercise for you that will leave you happy and satisfied. Discover your niche, run with it and leave stress behind.

Getting into the zone where you appreciate that exercise or any of these activities provide a challenge yes, but is offset by your ability, focus and energy can be pretty liberating and empowering. No case has ever been made where stress allowed to thrived have produced anything but more stress, a decline in health and chronically negative attitudes and behaviors. The onus is on you, the individual, runner or not, to seize the opportunity before you and rise above current circumstances – just as the american patriot chooses to rise above partisan politics, for the greater good – in this case, for your greater good.

Sources: themayoclinic.com, active.com, runnersworld.com

The Running Life: Finding balance and loving what you do

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Online source unknown

Juggling running, exercise, work, family, volunteer commitments and a social life can be challenging at best. Oftentimes, it can be downright difficult, though there are the few times one is able to soar, until challenge sets in and things progress to the difficult stage; on and on it goes, becoming a cyclical norm that you soon get accustomed to. Difficult much? Yes, Impossible? No. It becomes the goal of the challenged to strike a precarious balance so as to maximize the benefit of all.

Indeed, it doesn’t require any specific skill per se, but ideally a set of character traits and a passion or love for what you do that motivates the heck out of you. The average Joe seeks a purpose in life and has a desire to be happy. Uncovering his purpose and actively working/ walking it out sets him on a path to happiness and success. It is no different for the runner. He or she is able to enjoy the gift of running when other areas of life are in sync. Running may even be seen as the glue that holds it all together – the stress release factor to make sure that everything runs smoothly. However it may be looked upon, it is necessary to apply it in concord with life’s other goals. For example, for those with immediate families running is treated as a family affair. It is encouraged, supported and advocated among family members to ensure that the runner has support to successfully pursue it. As such, it becomes a daily routine of sorts, this ensures it has its place in the runner’s life and maximizes his or her chances of success. Also, it is viewed as much more than a sport, more as a lifestyle with healing and health benefits.

Many successful runners who are not pros pursue running as a passion and tend to build a support network around it. For my part, I find it easier to perform in other areas of my life with running and/or exercise as part of my daily schedule. A typical day either beginning or ending with running will generally flow between family, work and some type of social engagement. Of course I credit the healthy flow among my various roles to running and exercise. I’d be lying if I say I didn’t believe it centers me; but more than that, it gives me an outlet to express so many emotions (negative and positive) as well as provides a basis for my faith and personal growth.

The key on living a successful life, and that may mean different things for different people, remains pretty much constant across the spectrum: find a happy medium. In this your “happy place” you will be able to treat with the challenges of life and be able to channel any resulting negative energy into creating something good. You better believe it, fit and healthy has a lot to do with happy.

The Freedom to Run – Happy 4th!

Happy Fourth Of July!

Happy Fourth Of July!

Many of us take our freedom for granted. We live in a country unrivaled in its advocacy and support for  individual freedom and one’s right to practice, speak, share and do just about anything that does not endanger or threaten that same freedom we all enjoy. To the extent that we embrace these rights responsibly, we have a very good chance of living a fruitful, productive and healthy life.

Four years ago Blomberg Rankings did a survey on the world’s healthiest countries, many wondered where was the US on this list. http://www.bloomberg.com/slideshow/2012-08-13/world-s-healthiest-countries.html#slide21                   Ranking 37th, the United States, arguably one of the most developed countries in the world did not then produce a rating worthy of its standing. The question is, why? And have we progressed for there at all?

Chief among the reasons for our poor showing on Blomberg’s list is our inability to take responsibility for our health. More than how we treat our bodies (diet and exercise), holistic wellbeing ( body, mind and spirit) speaks to correctly embracing an attitude of health and wellbeing that informs our decisions and subsequent actions, thus creating a lifestyle of worth and enduring happiness.

Can we truly say we are free if we fail to use our freedom to educate and liberate ourselves from a mindset that harms and hinders us from realizing our full potential? Blame a fast food culture, advertising, social media, everything but ourselves, and our responsibility to make wise choices. We’ve heard time again that nothing in life is free, it is true. Our freedom came at great cost to many, we have the responsibility to embrace and promote it. To whom much is given, much is expected. One way we can do this is by adopting a healthy lifestyle; for those of us who run, we’re halfway there already. For all of us, let’s commit to embracing freedom beginning one step at a time. Celebrate: get out, get going, get active. Be Healthy. 

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Happy Independence!

Hello Summer, Runners

source: welland good.com

source:
welland good.com

I’m probably the most excited runner you’ll meet for the entire summer. I’ve lost count of the times I’ve heard, “are we there yet?” It’s finally safe to say we are! Gone are the coats and heavy jackets and reels of scarves etc. Bring on the hats, sunglasses, shorts, tanks and well.. gallons of sunscreen. It’s all good; as long as we’ve got trees, breeze, trails, dusk, dawn and the gym, we’ve got this.

source: she knows.com

source: she knows.com

Some may argue that summer is just about the hardest time to get yourself motivated to exercise – it just being so hot and all. I beg to differ. Summer implies a time of adventure, frolicking, fun and getting out and about. Many of us grab some time off to go on vacation, whether for a week or a month, what better time to get and stay active giving all the running around that entails. Some of you may know of my penchant for destination marathons, I try to get at least one good adventure run in during these months, but there are so many more runs going on, whatever your style it’s out there. Add to that some exciting activities one can get up to and man.. you’re talking three months of endless fun.

source: indiatimes.com

source: indiatimes.com

Summer fun activ-ities include hiking, camping, trail running, obstacle racing, surfing, kayaking, roller blading, biking, dancing, cross fit and yoga and its variations. There are many other options for the average runner or person to add some variety to their regular schedule; summer provides the opportunity to do away with routine and shake it up, to wring from these sunny days all the fun they’re worth. Regardless of how you choose to do so, it’s a bonus when you look and feel better as a result of actively engaging those muscles to stay fit and strong. An important point to remember is to try to run at the sun’s lowest point to minimize heat & sun exposure. This means early mornings or late evenings as well as sticking to the shade when necessary. Couple that with lots of fluid to stay hydrated and loads of sunscreen and you’ll have a summer to run for.  Beach bodies you’re welcome!

summer-fun

National Fitness and Sport Month – Stay Fit

run I couldn’t let May pass by without putting in a plug for Fitness, which is our ultimate goal. A desire to be fit and healthy regardless of the path we choose to get there, should be the driving force behind our runs or whatever form of exercise we choose. If we happen to love it and/or are good at what we choose, then that’s an added bonus.

Fitness-Holidays_Homepage_Slider

We live in very interesting times. Never before in history have people been so aware of their health and bodies, while having the knowledge and information to actually impact it in a positive way. Paradoxically, never before have we been privy to the illnesses and challenges to health that is claimed as the price of progress. To my way of thinking, knowledge remains power and we are perfectly poised to capitalize on the information and resources that are out there. Whether we will choose to take an active part and manage our health or wait on the sidelines and fall victim to the blame game remains a question only we can answer. Ample opportunity exists for those of us who physically can to embrace a method or form of exercise that works for us; one that we can work with and not dread, for while a challenge is necessary, exercise that is uninspiring and a dreaded chore is unproductive and counterintuitive. We often talk about exercise and our jobs like it’s a death sentence of sorts, and it shouldn’t be, we can enjoy or love what we do. In fact, we should; life is too short for otherwise.
Whether you choose to run, jog, walk, bike, dance, stretch, spin, skate, skip, make use of the gym, take gym classes and / or play a sport, they’re all exercise and all count towards a healthier and fitter you. Though May is almost over, it can be the start of something new or the chance to explore other avenues that will keep you active and healthily engaged. Since that has always been our goal, I’m totally on board and hope you take advantage of these last few May days to get there.

Post-Marathon: Recovery is Cool

I don’t regret my painful times, I bare my scars as if they were medals. I know that freedom has a high price, as high as that of slavery; the only difference is that you pay with pleasure and a smile, even when that that smile is dimmed by tears. – Paul Coelho

Two weeks, I am told, two weeks off will make it all better. Promises..promises. I’m kidding of course. As disappointing as my last race was and as much as I am tempted to get right back in and push at doing better, training harder, running faster, wisdom has it that I stand a much better chance of performing better in the long-term if I recover well.

The idea of recovering after a marathon, giving your body time to heal, is not a new one and is touted by many pros and coaches as necessary and even critical for maximising your long-term potential. It is true that I’ve never paid much mind to this strain of thought before now, but then I am a believer in listening to your body and the truth is mine was crying out for some rest. That doesn’t mean it was an easy decision to make, on the contrary, it took a friend of mine pushing none-to-gently (we all need friends like that) and finally being struck with the cold to get me to capitulate and surrender myself to two weeks sans running. I felt so terrible the first week – due to the cold firstly and then because I couldn’t run – I couldn’t even go to the gym to assuage my sense of deprivation with a workout and was forced to rest. Seems one benefit of recovery is to boost the immune system to guard against viruses, colds and such. Any wonder I needed it? During this recovery period, the focus is on muscle and cell repair and giving my immune system the boosts it needs by resting, sleeping and eating well.

Once I’m working with a goal I’m much more receptive, so this past week hasn’t been so bad. I’m on the mend and proved it with some gym classes, consider it light cross-training. Next week, I’ll resume with some light running as a slow build-up to getting back in training mode. No surprise there..I’m a runner aren’t I? There are races to run, new courses to discover, runners to meet and hopefully PRs to be made. With Boston 2016 behind me, though the disappointment will be with me for a while, I’m relieved and anxious to see what this new running phase will bring. Also, I’m looking forward to shaking things up a bit in the hopes of garnering better results. This is me; always looking at ways to improve as an individual and as a runner; the responsibility and power to do so is mine.

blog2~2

source: womenfitness.co.uk

 

 

Carbs and I go Running

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Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products. Though often maligned in trendy diets, carbohydrates — one of the basic food groups — are important to a healthy diet (livescience.com). They are to runners what crack is to an addict. We crave it..we need it..we can’t run without it – not efficiently anyway. Bad analogy I know but you get the point. While many diet fads are trying their darnest to get folks out there to quit the carbs as a requirement for weight loss, so not true by the way, we pack it on in the name of running; and so what if we actually enjoy it.

Good Carbs                                                                                                                                        Carbs are good, scratch that, carbs are great for you. They are a necessary ingredient to your diet and a main source of energy for runners. In fact, tired, fatigued, listless, unable to complete your running workouts of late? It could well mean your diet is low in this primary fuel source. Numerous studies and information by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics particularly support a diet rich in whole grains and protein for athletes. While I am well aware that we are all in the days of counting calories, it is important to note that the emphasis is on simple carbs with naturally  occurring sugars like those found in dairy, fruit, vegetables, legumes and some whole grains (these provide more of a quick bursts of energy) and your more complex carbs or starchy foods like potatoes, corn and other whole grains. These provide more sustained energy levels needed to carry you through your workouts and runs.

Carbing Up with Power Carbs                                                                                                      Most runners readily agree that carbing up is all part of the marathon training plan and should come into play just around the same time as tapering does – 2 weeks out from the big day.  The truth is carbs are a steady part of my diet throughout the year; all I do different now that race day is fast approaching is be a bit more focused in my selections, which just means eating more carbs as I tone down my running and thus storing up on my energy level, as much as possible, for the marathons. Some of the best carbs, which can be taken pre, post and during workouts to boost up and recover include: bananas, berries, old-fashioned oats, whole wheat pasta, tomato sauce, whole grain bread, energy bars, Gatorade, brown rice and low-fat yogurt (competitor.com).

An Evolving World not so much an Evolving Diet                                                                 The world has evolved from diets  once thought of as either vegan or omnivore as most of us were. Changing times have seen the advance of gluten-free, paleo and other types of diets, most with the aim of getting you to eat healthier, which is a laudable thought if only it is wholesome and sustainable. While each person is different and may respond differently to different foods, a proper and healthy diet consist of carbohydrates. All things in moderation being the watch words. As such, I’m having a guilt-free, carb-enhanced two weeks and have only two words for you,  simply decadent😜.

The Power Of Sleep

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houstonchronicle.com

It’s funny how as you grow older you come to recognize how much your body depends on the little things you take for granted, and while you may have been able to squeeze by on say, bad eating habits, regular partying and drinking, late nights, poor rest and little sleep, as you cross the mid-thirty threshold whether runner or not, you begin to feel, look, and in many cases, perform differently. Your body lets you know in no uncertain terms that unlike before when you could get by on the fly of youth, now you would have to earn it. Those eight hours of restfull bliss that you credited only to growing minds have once again become a necessary reality for both the athlete and healthy-minded individual.

Dr. Matthew Edlund, director of the Center for Circadian Medicine, claims “you’re always remaking your body,” and you need sleep to do that. While we sleep, our bodies release growth hormone, rebuild muscles, and rewire our brains. Studies have found that chronic sleep deprivation decreases the time before an athlete reaches exhaustion. And, even one night without sleep decreased the distance test subjects were able to run in a half-hour (Sleep In — It Will Make You Faster, By Kelly O’Mara, competitor.com)

Honestly, I enjoy sleep. In my book, it ranks high up there on my sacred list of things that give unequal enjoyment – demands nothing in return. Thing is, in this day and age of relative unconectivity and constant movement, where we are busy going nowhere fast, it has become more and more difficult to find the time to do so. Amid a lot of struggles, the struggle to garner enough rest on a daily basis has become only too real. As a result, I find myself unable to fulfill my highest potential in many activities that require strenuous effort and attention. In other words, I’m way to tired, way to often. I’m also convinced that were there to be increased hours in the day, we would find even more ways to fill it up and sleep would still be neglected. Sleep just can’t win and for that matter neither will we, not if we continue at the current rate; at some point out bodies are going to yell “enough!” Why should it take that for us to stop and take notice? The red flags are there if we will but open our eyes to them. They include: constant and easy tiredness, lethargy, crankiness and short-temperedness, moodiness, poor concentration and inattentiveness, decreased strength and mediocre performance.

Some ways, aside from keeping your goal in mind, of combatting the sleep-depriving demon are:
1. Create an atmosphere for rest and relaxation: thus, your bedroom should be used only for this purpose with the correct temperature and lighting providing an ambience that is relaxing and sleep-friendly.
2. Have a set schedule where enough sleep is factored in per day: this could mean giving yourself a specific time to go to bed and treating it as you would your training schedule (sacred).
3. Go to bed earlier if you are an early riser to ensure your body gets enough rest. 
4. It helps to relax before bed to get yourself in the zone: eat dinner early, tone down activities and sources of entertaining stimulation and stay away from caffine and alcohol.
5. Nap as needed when sleep-deprived: this can help greatly in reducing stress, restoring energy and concentration though it is not a substitute for being well rested.
There is no denying that each individual is different and so has different needs and so while we all need sleep, we may need different amounts and at different times. Your best bet is to find out what works best for you. While 8-10 hours is the average need of an athlethe, you may find that you feel well and rested after 7 or 9 hours. It is your body and your call, you get to determine this based on the red flags noted above. As you come to discover the power of a good night’s rest, you may discover the reasons behind you falling short on that PR goal.
Watch: The Importance Of Sleep video

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