Global Virtual Marathon

Running View of The Hudson along Henry Hudson Drive

I took to the Jersey Hills, commonly known as The Palisades for a very uncommon or rather unconventional 26.2 miles two weeks ago. I guess this run was a make up of sorts for what was almost my yearly spring trek to Boston, which of course didn’t happen this year nor last year. In a surprising but welcome twist the Boston marathon is now happening in October this year, which falls in line with the strangest of seasons we’ve been in. These past fourteen months have been interesting to say the least and heartbreaking at best. For this reason we welcome the turn of the tide and anything that resembles a leg up from the dark hole we’ve been existing in. So I’m grateful for World Marathon Majors (WMM) and other running organizations that have worked tirelessly to get runners to keep the marathon spirit alive and allowed us a platform to come together and compete albeit in a friendly atmosphere even if the only competition is ourselves.

Along the running path – Henry Hudson Drive

I started off running at W 168th Street in upper Manhattan in pretty close proximity to the George Washington (GW) Bridge, which connects New York to New Jersey, and all too soon found myself suspended over the Hudson River running along the pedestrian path and against the traffic heading into New York. I opted for a late afternoon run in order to maximize the coolness of the day. With a tiny bag pack holding my fuel I felt pretty good heading in surrounded a plethora of trees, the cacophony of nature sounds, and dramatic views overlooking the Hudson, it was a runner’s heaven really. As with most weekends out there, there are lots of cyclists, a few walkers, and fewer still runners. I must have been 1 in 3, maybe. And all went well up to mile 10 when the last hill on the way in forced me to slow all the way down to a power walk. I figured I had to conserve energy for heading back or else I’d be walking for a long time. From then on I started running the flats and downhills and most of the uphills except for the steep climbs which I power walked without exception. Because this was a timed race with no stopping allowed, had I not decided on a power walk strategy from early on it may have been impossible to finish in the time I did.

By the time I got out of the woodsy area and was back on the bridge it was evening time and the city lights were coming on by the end of my run, which wrapped up at W 72nd and Broadway in Manhattan. Gotta say I was creamed by then and can’t remember a recent time I was so happy to see the finish line. I celebrated with a large coconut water – the best thing I had tasted all day. Marathon #20, marathon distance #21 is in the books. What’s certain is that I won’t be recommending this course and those hills for anyone who’s looking for a qualifier or who has a finish goal time of under 3:45:00.

March Running Madness: 32 Impromptu Miles

Mile 26- Along Battery City Park Esplanade, New York, N.Y.

Hey friends! I’ve been away from the blog for a few weeks as there’s been so much happening just in the first three months of the year already. Seems I may have overextended myself with other activities including running thus leading to a lack of time for writing. I should know better since with me there’s always the temptation to do more. In any event, March came and the cold weather hung around dragging out to the very end. In fact, we’ve had the oddest weather; from perfect days, to bitter cold, windy, and rainy downpours. Like what in the world! We’ve only not seen snow this month – minus a few early threats. It’s still early in my view though, with April showers on the way, and snow in April is not unheard of.

Be that as it may, I made a determined effort this month to get back to regular gym workouts and to continue running, cycling has been on hold pending improved weather conditions. While my running hasn’t been excessive, I have managed to run at least five days per week this month, albeit shorter distances. What happened was, a few of us from my  pre-covid run group decided on a March intention – to run the United Airlines NYC Half Marathon, which of course went virtual this year. We agreed to run solo, in the interest of those running for time, and then follow up with a fun run a week later. Mission accomplished! A couple weekends ago, I ran an out and back in Queens, as my NYC Half, with a couple breath-catching stops along the way and opted to pass on running for time owing to the stops I had made. Nonetheless, I did manage to feel pretty good about my efforts and felt pretty confident I could do a longer run. So much so, that that I went ahead and signed up straight away for the global virtual marathon organized by World Marathon Majors ( WMM) on
May 1. That fun run though, well that turned into something else.

Lo and behold, this past weekend, we took off for that “fun” run with a couple of runners deciding on a perimeter run around Manhattan – 32 miles – they having trained for this distance. The rest.of the group chose to hop on for certain segments, while myself and another runner opted to start off with the ultra runners and see how far we could get to. No surprise, I ended up running the full distance though no training made the latter part a tough run. Don’t do that please. The truth is I probably would not have been able to complete that distance had the organizers not planned it down to the tiniest detail to include a slow-to-medium steady pace to ensure completion in under 5 hours.

Mile 22 – Along the East River Esplanade

In fact the planning was so great, I would forgive you for thinking they had something to do with the weather, which was perfect for running. And since Manhattan is an island surrounded by water, the views were nothing short of stunning. We enjoyed a seamless transition from one stage of the run to the next and had a good support and tracking system that enabled us to pick up runners along the way and meet at preselected rendezvous/ fuel points. I was so impressed with the organization and support that it felt natural to finish with the group and I’m sure I was the only one putting pressure on myself to finish. I felt strong up until mile 25, but from then on my feet were definitely dragging. It was only out of sheer stubbornness, and the amazing support, from other runners, that I finished up the final seven miles. Dead is an apt description for how my feet felt when we got done but mann what a great feeling of accomplishment! I had only ever done one other ultra marathon before and that one was over five hours, so imagine my satisfaction to come in under five.

All’s well that ends well. I can’t promise that I’ll do that again without training, but as we know crazy things happen all to often and I’m way too open to impromptu runs of any nature. Thank God it turned out all right in the end.

Snow Running Is On

I used to say I would never, that I can’t, and that I won’t ever be caught alive..LOL..running in a foot of snow. Why would I do that? I’m not crazy. In fact, I don’t even like snow like that or the cold at all for that matter! In the future, remind me how not fun it is to eat one’s words, as I’m having to gorge out right now. Since February began, I’ve been running every which way and sideways in some really freezing conditions with snow and ice everywhere. I’m not even kidding y’all. I haven’t seen such icy conditions for such a prolonged period of time in a minute or, more precisely, in some years. Like what is going on around here? I’m dealing with it in the only way I know how, telling myself that somewhere out there in this big world somebody[s] need this cold and that the cycle of life is necessary for human survival. Maybe so, but gosh darn its blisteringly cold at times and causing all sorts of mayhem on the roads in the United States. In addition, the runner in me cannot be silenced so I’ve been layering up and braving the elements in total defiance of conventional wisdom. Now I’m officially part and parcel of those “crazy people who go running in the snow.”

Post the snow storm

I gotta give a lot of kudos to Strava in getting me out the door – being part of an online community of runners, especially in this Covid world – has motivated me (who prize myself on being self-motivated) to stay connected and to keep logging those miles. Every now and then, I’ll get on the app and see runners all over the world doing their thing; overcoming obstacles, meeting milestones, shifting barriers – no matter how small or big they are – and I’m like, I have no excuse. I have health, strength, and two legs. So what if it’s freezing? There are layers for that. And so without a reason there is now endless opportunities for running or jogging or walking and trudging through snow. Cycling, not so much. I’m not that crazy, yet.

However, there are a few things where I draw the line: early morning runs and evening runs. These days runs typically take place midmorning to early afternoon and sometimes I find myself coming back in the latter part of the afternoon. On those days it’s usually accompanied by blazing but cold sunshine, though not as cold as under grey and cloudy skies. Can I tell you, that those grey days feel like I’m encased in an icebox of sorts and the only relief comes from burrowing into myself. I usually go for a run – run to the gym, work out, then run home, and spend a bit of time warming up when I get there before I feel human-like again. The steady motion and movement keeps my synapses firing and I generally don’t have much time to process it until I’m in the shower by which time it’s thankfully done. Talk about thankful for a delayed reaction because by then I’m in full there-is-no-way-you-could-get-me-out-the-door mode.

On the run

A few days ago, around 3 pm, I opted to go for an afternoon run after a snow storm two days prior. Because I decided on a route I hadn’t been in a bit, I was excited and careful to dress the part. I double-socked (if that’s a thing), thriple-layered my upper region, and double-layered underneath until I was sure I would be dragging with all the extra clothes. I also put on my trail running sneakers. Speed is not the goal I reminded myself, staying vertical and moving was. With all the sidewalk snow practice I’d had, you’d think I would be more adept at navigating myself through the ice and as much as 2 feet of snow in some areas. No sir. I was running – too fast sometimes – and skipping and sliding everywhere. Thankfully no falls. Though it was close at times, I managed to keep the momentum going and was wowed enough by the stark, whiteness and beauty of the winter wonderland I was in, that I all but forgot to feel cold until I had to stop to take photos. Obviously, it was a slower run but the path was pretty amazing; all scenic and rural-woodsy looking. I felt as if I was in some unknown landscape having an icy adventure, with very few humans out on the snowy trails.

Snow trail

Now I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not necessarily looking to do that again anytime soon, it was almost 10 miles of snow after all. I think I’ll just stick to the sidewalks, back roads, and the park. I’ll keep dodging black ice, and slush, and puddles, and trudging through the areas in Queens that don’t get quite such a quick or clean sweep from the residents and snow ploughs as the city does. It sounds more dangerous than it is but it’s certainly much safer than being out in the snowy woods all alone. The greatest downside and my favorite is that the trails are so much more breathtaking and are littered with views to run for. I guess I’ll have to get back there eventually. For the sake of running views, I’ll do almost anything. 😜

Winter Brr Miles

Randall’s Island

It’s been 2021 for a minute already if you can believe it and I’m still trying to figure out my winter running plans. That’s right, it’s also Winter in these parts. And though we haven’t gotten much snow yet, it’s pretty chilly. Yours truly is not so motivated to go freeze on my own, because yes, we’re still living in a Covid world where social distancing is the new normal. Arrgh. Man was not made to live alone no matter what they tell you, we need active, life-giving relationships and steady interaction, which is necessary for thriving I’m told. So I wanna thrive! Survival happens to be overrated anyway. Enter 2021 and a new year of possibilities and hopefully more opportunities than the last.

Just us 3

Thriving in mind, I’ve decided to mix up my running with some small group runs at least once a month for the next few months while it’s cold. That, or I might just go into hibernation and we can’t have that. So Sunday gone, I headed out for a run to Randall’s Island in Manhattan. Darn it was cold! And I can promise you I would’t have left home if I didn’t have me some running company – the best kind. We decided we would try for 10 miles and add on more depending on how it felt. It didn’t. Feel good. 10 miles was enough to witness the gorgeous but chilling sunshine and the gusty views of the city once we got over the 102nd Street bridge via the East River running path. No surprise that there were other humans braving the temps. NYC is like that – people tend to the outdoors since apartment coop-up is not really a thing around here. Thankfully, we weren’t in the park so there were less of us. Still, it’s good to know you’re not the last crazy runner left. We started out at 65th and 3rd Ave and ran across the bridge on 61st to get to the East River running path and ran all the way up to 102nd Street and across the bridge to Randall’s Island. We then did an almost full loop with one bathroom stop before heading back over the bridge. Pretty simple and on the average day a very easy run.

102nd Street Bridge in the distance

It felt amazing to be out in the elements being a bit of a badass runner except it required mass effort to breathe in chilly air, talk, and face cover all at the same time. Don’t get me wrong, I was happy for a face covering as it kept my face warm but I did have some gasping-for-air moments that was as a result of the cold air. We followed the same path back to our starting point and of course that went by much faster. Can’t say I wasn’t happy when it was over, though for an insane moment I contemplated running over the Queensboro bridge with another runners. Good sense prevailed however, and I ditched that idea as I felt it would be too windy going over the water at that height. We split separate ways and let’s just say I didn’t revert to normal body temperature until some 4 hours later.

In the train station

Since last Sunday, I’ve had a few runs in freezing temps but I’ve been careful to keep them brief, at the peak of the day, and to remain in motion for the duration of the run. The key to not hating running in the cold so much is to dress warmly. While you can’t really wear a lot of clothes and run comfortably, you can dress smartly with proper wicking and insulated gear to stave off the cold from penetrating your body. I usually wear triple layers on my top half, double layers for my bottom half and double up on socks, shoot for insulated gloves – weirdly enough I run with my hands in my jacket pockets, don’t ask –  and a balaclava or neck gaiter with a hat works in addition to a hoodie to keep my face protected. Even with all that most times you may still be cold, especially if it’s windy. At that point you may want to throw on a windbreaker on top of all that. The trick is to keep moving, keep it to the point, and run with the wind at your back if possible. For winter running, you really just want to get out there and back in as soon as possible. For me, the accomplishment is all in layering up and getting out the door, even if it’s just for a couple miles; distance is of minor consequence and speed even less so. My badassery, LOL, (my word) comes in knowing that I didn’t succumb to the temptations of warm duvet covers and quilts..Lord knows I wanted to..but I dug deep and found that fit chick that is often very willing to do all that’s crazy in the name of exercise.

All Peaches and Running for Christmas 🎄

@Savannah Rapids Running Trail

Took a few weeks to catch my breath and tie up some end-of-the-year loose ends. Lo and behold I ended up in Georgia, though in the weeks leading up I wouldn’t have know that would be the case. It’s not an absolute surprise of course, as I generally go home for the holidays only this year I really wasn’t sure if that family tradition would stand. It did. I’m here. And I’m glad that after much wrestling, I finally settled on what feels like the right choice. Dammed if you, dammed if you don’t really, so amidst the frantic worry of health and safety I’m in full compliance with all Covid protocols since traveling here last Monday. Fast forward to today, 2 days post Christmas already, when I took off on a run to the tune of beautiful sunshine and Fall in full bloom despite the official start of winter a few days ago.

 

Fall in Georgia brings to mind acorns, more acorns, spanish moss, lots of colors, the best running temps, and peaches of course – well it should, except I have yet to see any on my runs. Peach cobbler, on the other hand, runs aplenty in the georgian diet for those interested. No matter the lack of peaches, I’m in seventh heaven running in these parts especially on the trails and along the less traveled paths. It always takes me back to when I first came here some thirteen years ago. A bit of a star-gazer back then, still am, I was more wont to run and dream. I mean running makes everything better right. Every dream is more possible, goals seem more probable, thoughts become crystalized and even plans take flight with these steps. Running amidst the pine cones and spanish moss sure birthed a lot of possibilities that had a lot of potential. In fact, it’s where my first idea to run the New York City marathon germinated. Now, four of those and sixteen others later, I have to say running in these parts even today, sure does feel a bit magical still.

 

Running through my old neighborhood, and a few new ones, makes me appreciative of the differences in topography -gentle slopes makes for easy running – and boy do I appreciate sidewalks a whole lot more. I also enjoy the quiet and scenery a lot while running, it’s really a treat for the eyes, and so I’m able to fully appreciate the running experience here while being thankful for what I have in New York. I am tickled to run around my old stomping grounds and love stopping for photos of the most picturesque and memorable scenes I’m able to capture on my phone. I’m having so much fun visiting old running haunts and finding new ones and hope to add a few more miles to my 2020 mileage before I leave on Friday.

 

Additionally, I’ve visited the gym a few times already and while they’re not following strict Covid guidelines with masks etc it appears it’s an individual decision to go and then to take the necessary precautions, which I am, so that works for me. I’m happy to be running, and working out in the gym, and visiting my family, and seeing my friends safely. That I even have the opportunity for all this is an amazing blessing and I’m super thankful.

 

I think it’s important, given all the angst we have with how things have progressed over the past nine months, to finish off this year with purpose and passion and nothing quite does that for me like running does. In these final days of 2020, I will focus on the wonderful things I enjoy and the good things about my life and about our world. It is no secret that running and my faith in God continues to keep me. I pray it keeps you too.

26.2 miles of New York City: unofficially marathon #20

E66 Run Group

Bet 2020 didn’t think I had it left in me! After all the crazy dished out this year, the opportunity to run a marathon this Fall was a blessing, a clap-back, and a slight risk all at once. All things considered and with the recommended guidelines in place, we chalked up any reservations we had and got all excited to run. And run we did. Last Saturday we, my pre-covid run group, and still my run group, took a jaunt through manhattan on our own New York City marathon distance, some of us anyway, the others chickened out and did a half. LOL. I’m kidding. No chickens. We had decided a few weeks ago that some people just weren’t prepared for 26.2 miles just yet – many not having run much this year at all. And so a couple of us opted to push ahead and tackle the distance. In fact, I had only gotten to 18 miles in training and was willing to swing it for the remaining distance. I usually tell people who ask to listen to your body and go with your training, a bit of advice that, more often than not, works pretty well. This time I heeded my own advice and was the poster child for listening to one’s body. Early on, I had decided that if I could do 18 miles mildly uncomfortable, then I could finish a marathon distance. I went in knowing that while it mightn’t end pretty, it would be doable.

November is known for its versatile weather in NYC. I have a number of past nyc marathon experiences to hail from when it comes to the unpredictability of the weather during this month. Fom wet, cold, windy days to hot, humid, and even perfect conditions, I’m almost certain that we’ve had a snowy one in there too; there’s just no accounting for what a typical marathon day in November in this city could look like. In 10 years I’ve seen them all. So while we were hoping for good running weather, we didn’t really hang out hopes on it. When we got 45°- 50°F we were thrilled. Sunshiny, partly cloudy, and with some early wind was a bargin really. Two of us started out just after 8:15 am Saturday morning and ran from the East Side of mid-Manhattan over to the west side highway and down along the waterfront to Battery Park for a looped distance of 13 miles whereupon we met up with 8 others to run the latter half of our marathon and their half marathon. We were supposed to have met up with another runner in our earlier half who we eventually saw in the latter half of the run, he having run the full distance also, albeit via a slightly different route.

It is worth mentioning that for all the nyc marathons I’ve run, this is the first time it didn’t feel like such a chore, though to be honest the Fifth Ave leg of the run felt just as difficult as previous times, and this is without the crowds. What! Why! I don’t know. For sure it has always been the most difficult part of the marathon and this time proved no different. It was long, tedious, uphill-ish, and having to use the cobble sidewalks, which I avoided at all cost, did not make it any easier. I lagged the entire way until we got to the park as I had taken a wrong turn in Harlem and fell behind. There was just no way I was catching up and I opted not to kill myself trying. It was such a beautiful day for running, it was no surprise to see endless runners among others out in Central Park enjoying the sunshine. We did one lower loop then the hills were too much to take and so a couple of us headed out the park to do the final 2.5 miles on Park Avenue. By that time, I was ready to finish, muscles were tight and sore and I was getting cold. We finished up at our run group location at Lululemon on the Upper East Side in a record 3:32 time minus a bathroom break in the earlys and 2 water stops. Not bad at all to the tune of a masked-covered runner’s reunion with snacks and socks instead of medals. LOL.

And that my friends was a wrap to my 20th marathon distance, the only unofficial one and the one I enjoyed the most. Technically, I shouldn’t still be getting lost and running off course – veteran of the course that I am – and so maybe I missed my chance of having a better 5th Ave experience because of that, but I guess I’ll never know now. Regardless, I’m chuffed that we were able to get together and respond in a positive way to all that 2020 dished out. Running and friends to the rescue of a year headed for the history books as one of the most difficult and mentally challenging years yet. By God’s grace we are still here and we even have a couple of runs planned through December. We will get through this one run at a time.

Marathon Season 2020

It happens every year around this time, New Yorkers fall into marathon mode. This year, notwithstanding Covid-19 and all the challenges it presents, we’re moving ahead full steam to take back what has been stolen, or at the very least what we’ve been cheated out of. And damn it it feels good! With all the virtual racing going on in lieu of typical road races, I’ve been feeling pretty isolated and so I decided to get everyone together for a kick-Covid-ass 26.2 run.

Truth is with everything and everyone on shutdown since March, folks are not ready for a full marathon distance. I don’t know that I am, but I’m all for giving it a try and among the old running crew there might be a few others crazy enough to have a go at it. I’m betting on it anyway. It’s hard to believe that we’re heading for November and what would have been the NYC marathon in just over a week! Except of course there’s no actual race this year..though the virtual race is set spanning a week or so and anyone anywhere in the world can sign up and participate via Strava. You can run the 26.2 distance wherever you are: get folks to support and run with you, have your own cheer squad, post pics, and tag race organizers doing it all your way and at your pace and convenience. Cool huh! I suppose that’s one way of keeping the spirit of the race alive.

We’ve planned our own version right here in NYC on November 14. A few, or dozen, of us plan on doing at least half of the 26.2 miles making use of the latter part of the nyc marathon course starting in Manhattan on the east side and running through Harlem, down Fifth Ave to finish up the final 3 miles in Central Park and end at the official nyc marathon finish line on Tavern on the Green. I, on the other hand, with at least one other – so far, plan on starting out earlier that morning to complete the first half (13.1 miles) before meeting up with the others to run the remaining distance. We’ll start out with the lower loop of Central Park and head out on Central Park West to run over to the West Side Highway where we’ll run a few miles heading downtown and do a loop to run back to meet with the other runners. Sounds easy enough but really I have no idea how I’ll feel that day. I haven’t run a marathon distance since last November and my longest run thus far has been 15 miles. I’m hoping to up that a bit this weekend but even so it’s still limited training in so far as long runs are concerned. Still, I like to think it’s like riding a bike, the body absolutely knows how to do it, it’s just getting it to remember and cooperate.

When this year started out, I had few running intentions really, just to do a spring triathlon and run the Chicago marathon. Because of Covid, neither panned out but it’s been years that I’ve been running a marathon almost every Fall and at the very least once for the year, even with the way things have gone in 2020, and because things have gone the way they have, I feel it’s even more necessary to show some fighting spirit and not allow the year to end on a note of defeat with many despairing and bemoaning the times. I refuse to sit down and take what life throws at me. I can run at least; thank God for good health and the ability to do so. And so that will be my response to this mess of a year. Speaking intentionally, the intention is to finish within 4 hours. While 3 & 1/2 hours would be great, I have low expectations given the training aspect as well as the biggest unknown factor, our infamous November weather, which can be anywhere on the weather map. Daunting prospects anyone?

Actually, I feel fine about the entire adventure. Yes, that’s what it is. We’re heading out on a dare-to-run-adventure that says more about us than anything else. I have to prove, to no one but myself, that I am fully capable of finishing what I start. And finish I intend to. I have a couple long runs left in me before the day and we’re about to find out just how a New Yorker does running pandemic or no pandemic. Stay tuned to find out how it goes!

Fall Running Favorites in the Big Apple 🍎☀️📸🍂🍁🦋🐿️🦆🕊️🦢🐦🏃🏽‍♀️🗽

Bow Bridge
@ Engineer’s Gate

It is a New York truism that Central Park is at its most gorgeous in Autumn. While Spring definitely has it’s charm, Summer is all get out beautiful, and winter can be a postcard perfect wonderland, Fall is by far my favorite in the park. I can’t put my finger on a singular thing but maybe it’s a combination: the riot of colors, the abundant foliage, the breathtaking views, the almost-there foot traffic, the near-perfect running temps, and the musical cacophony of the park’s residents. Autumn is everywhere in Central Park and for the above reasons, so am I.

Jackie Onassis Reservoir
Jackie Onassis Reservoir Running Path

Last week I took off on an impromptu run – the best kind – and can I just say.. wow. Mind you, I’ve made this park my running home, and I’ve been living in NYC for about 10 years now, so I’m not some starry eyed newbie. Still, it never gets old and gets me every time. Self confessed New Yorker that I am with a penchant for running all over this charming and gritty city, I am biased to Central Park. It is the epitome of an oasis in the desert and have served myself, thousands of New Yorkers, and millions of visitors over the years bringing respite, sanctuary, seclusion, nature, adventure, beauty, art, culture, and a host of other things that are quintessential New York to the world. I am just so stoked to have this as part of my New York life experience but more importantly as the catalyst for my running in this city. The park is where I started my 19-marathon running streak, that seems like ages ago now, and God’s willing there are a few more runs yet to explore here.

Running along the east side heading to 72nd Street
Along Cat Hill & heading to 72 St Transverse

Reminiscing aside, I must have been buoyed by that particular gorgeous Autumn day with its sights and sounds because I gleefully flew aka ran the 6-mile outer loop of the park, flitting in and out at various picturesque points to snap a quick shot or two of every which thing. It was a photo run, if there is such a thing, totally unorthodox in nature – pun intended – encompassing random yet popular, trivial yet wowing, basic yet catchy views. If Central Park was a person, it’s stealing shots of a person unbeknownst but really with that person knowing full well that people do it all the time. My run was littered with sudden stops, quickened pace, selfie poses, backtracking, off path jaunts, all the while happening in the early afternoon. I never run around midday unless it’s late Fall or winter as it’s the sunniest and least cold then and so it was the perfect running day. I wasn’t alone in this thinking as there were people everywhere. Seems there are many others that share my love for the park. It’s also the year of Covid-19, though you would never know it from inside this slice of heaven. In fact, you would be forgiven for forgetting, the only thing contagious there being the jovial and benevolent spirit of park goers. So for just about 2 hours, I ditched the mask, though I maintained social distance, and turned off the panic, noise, grit, and confusion of the outside world to just bask in the explosion of nature in the best place in my world right there and then.

Just about TCS Nyc Marathon Finish Line
Unnamed Rustic Bridge @ Southwest Reservoir

Pictures sometimes can’t really do justice to the reality but oftentimes it’s the best reminder we have and captures a moment in time that we’ll never get back. No matter how many times I’ve seen these, I never get tired of the views. Central Park is really my favorite place to be.

The Mall, William Shakespeare, & a Horse drawn Carriage

Strength for the Day 🏋🏽‍♀️

Wow what a crazy bunch of weeks the past month has been! I’ve had a death in my family – no relation to Covid- had to sit an exam in the same week, facilitate online activities and projects for the kids I tutor and my volunteer group, and still find time for running, cycling, and strength exercise. I need a vacation! Yup. Somewhere idyllic that involves a lot of nature, beaches, hiking, waterfalls, incredible sunsets, and sunrises to run for and that is non-covid threatening. If anyone knows of a place on earth like this that I could safely travel to, please help out a fellow runner. I’ll pay all that I have, which may not be a lot but c’mon it’s all I have – cause then I’ll probably never come back. In the interim, I really need to get into a sustainable routine that’s not so crazy and I should be fine. I think.

Since time waits on no man, and there’s no woman exception, we’re going full steam ahead into October and the full effect of Fall season. We’re talking Halloween🎃, which I don’t really care for and then Thanksgiving🦃, which is going to be very interesting this year, and the holiday Sales💰, which I might care more about if I had money to spend but really it’s not even on my radar right now. What is on there is that we are slowly and differently running again! I mean no big fall marathons, such as we’ve gotten accustomed to – ♥️NYC marathon and Chicago Marathons♥️ – but there are smaller races happening and the novel option to run said bigger races as virtual experiences this year. This is good news for runners like myself. It’s been all sorts of terrible for the racing world, and everyone really, since March and it’s good to know that we’re taking some running steps if not strides yet. I am thankful and strong!

Good news is also spreading in our fitness community. While things are different and not ideal, gyms are open and those that have been climbing the walls of their apartments in this city have the opportunity to hop in and out for a bit of a different scene that involves a lot of new guidelines but allows them to workout in the company of others once more – of sorts anyway. School too, has resumed, of sorts, and some people are back to work, again of sorts, but these days I’ll take all the “of sorts” as oppose to not-at-all. Among the important and relevant news is that I’m finished with my PT certification! It’s been some 10 weeks that I’ve been inundated with nothing but the biomechanics of the human movement system and I swear if it had not been for the the Good Lord and running, my mind would be toast. I made it and none too soon as cooler running temps are here. I have a lot of energy, good and bad, to burn as I get my feet moving and the blood pumping once more. Marathon season, whether there is a live one or not, is here and I’m about to run one just because I can. Well I hope I can anyway; while it’s been a minute with that sort of distance, I’m not worried about it. My lungs and feet are strong!

It’s the little things my friends. Gratefulness is my new mantra. That I can run, exercise, commit to a program, have the resources I need, pass am exam, celebrate my dad’s long years and that I have life, enjoy physical health and a sound mind – they are in fact not at all little but they’re definitely the things I’ve taken for granted in the past. Covid-19 has forever changed that, and me, and a lot of us I’d wager, but it’s for the better and that can only be a good thing. Each day I awake, more aware, more focused, more blessed to be here, no matter the inconveniences and despite the tragedies and loss. My story isn’t over and neither is yours; we have been given strength for today, and for tomorrow, and for the next day, and the next if God wills it. Now let me dig deep for the strength I need for 26.2 in this very unconventional Marathon season. And, BTW, yes you can! We are strong and getting only stronger in this season together.

Comment below if you’re up for it! #letsrun🏃🏼‍♀️🏃🏽‍♀️🏃🏾

August and my Thoughts Have Run Away

It’s been a minute (meaning awhile – don’t ask me why we speak all wrong sided – not my generation 🤭) since I’ve got on here! Truthfully, I’ve had good intentions and even started writing about all the good stuff I was doing and the projects I was getting done (not really) but then yesterday happened and I hadn’t finished yet and so the relevant kinda went away with August. And you know what they say about good intentions – it’s a hellish road – that of course would be closer to the truth, mostly anyway. It’s been pretty much I driving me crazy with too much studying and myself trying to keep us sane by running and biking around. If it doesn’t confuse or concern you that I’m having a split personality complex right there then read on.

Let me be clear, I’m not advocating cessa

Let me be clear, I’m not advocating an end to learning when you’ve hit a certain age, say “40” 😉 , but I am saying it seems like there’s so more work to be done and way less time to do it in. Whatever happened to long days with endless hours and grace periods and just plain grace? Apparently, a thing of the past in our new Covid-19 world, characterized by social distancing, work-from-home solutions, and real life Covid-related issues. I’m not sure I like this America. But who’s talking likes when survival is at stake. This year is about survival I’m told so I’m not allowed to indulge in sentimental platitudes that doesn’t serve the overarching agenda of staying safe and alive. What about sane then? That’s tied up in there, ain’t it? (Again, don’t ask me how that got in the dictionary, the urban one – not my generation) And yep, sane is game they say, so yes we can talk about that. Of course that brings me full circle to running.

I might have mentioned, sometime in the distant pre-Covid past, that running is my saving grace. Aha grace! There it is. Right here like me all along. So yeah running, it’s gotten me out of some bored, tedious, brain-racking, walls-closing-in situations in the past few months. Days when I didn’t know if I could read one more word, or participate in another zoom work session, or stand my own company for another minute – running reached in and rescued me. It’s been mostly late evenings and night runs in the past few weeks but in more recent days we’ve been on a few morning and afternoon runs as well. And might I just say how thankful I am for slightly cooler temps. Though I’m still sweating bullets most times, at least it’s not with blazing sunshine and that’s rather the cherry on top of the tempo, ladder workout, longish, Sprint, and discovery runs I’ve been varying as part of my running repertoire these days.

As we transition into September, I want to encourage you to stay committed to good health, and like the seasons that change, and with the literal advance of Autumn, we too can experience newness and growth and even a harvest. As like the good book says, let us not grow weary of doing good; of taking care of ourselves, of pursuing growth and development, of remaining committed to our intentions, and of finding ways to be a blessing, for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not. And that, friends, is my two cents farewell to August, hot summer runs, and hopefully Covid days!

Not gone too soon at all.

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